Is It Okay To Do Bicep Curls Every Day? (Yes, Here’s How)

Bicep Curls

Arms are my favorite body part to train, and sometimes it can be difficult to achieve progress with lagging body parts, especially the arms. One way we can stimulate growth in the biceps is to increase the amount that we do them each week.

So, is it okay to do bicep curls every day? Yes, you can do bicep curls every day as a tactic to improve the size of your arms. However, you might want to consider the daily volume that you do (the sets and reps), and whether or not it is absolutely necessary for you to train arms every day in order to see progress.

Sometimes it can be difficult to decide whether or not you should do biceps every day. 

So, in this article I will….

  • Help you decide if training biceps every day is for you
  • The pros and cons of daily bicep training
  • Different variations to use if you are going to train biceps every day; and,
  • How to program training your biceps daily

Bicep Curls Every Day: An Overview

Anatomically, the biceps are a smaller muscle, allowing us to do bicep curls more frequently and recover at a more effective rate. However, a challenge with smaller muscle groups is the degree at which we can load them is much less, so we have to take alternative tactics to achieve progress, such as doing bicep curls every day.

That being said, there needs to be strategy in proper daily volume allocation (sets and reps) when implementing an everyday bicep program. As we increase the frequency at which we target the biceps, consequently daily volume for bicep training must decrease as well.  

It is also worth noting that other pulling exercises target the biceps by consequence as well. Exercises such as t-bar rows or chin ups utilize the biceps secondary to back muscles, and can be incorporated with the targeting of biceps in mind.

Curious about training every day with other lifts as well? Check out these guides:

How To Do Bicep Curls Every Day Safely

While doing bicep curls every day is a great tactic to improve bicep size, we would need to work up to this weekly allotment.

Start by adding 1-2 days to the current frequency you have set up within your training protocols. Every 4-6 weeks you can add an additional day, while decreasing the volume of bicep curls that you do each day.

Moreover, implementing proper technique is fundamental to staying healthy as well. This can be further emphasized by incorporating tempo work and lighter sets to promote proper bicep curl execution.

The Pros Of Doing Bicep Curls Every Day

Increased Stimulus To Biceps

Biceps, or arms in general can be considered a stubborn muscle group because it can be challenging to grow them. Similar to implementing a large variety of movements and intensities to induce growth, changing weekly frequency of bicep curl sessions can as well.

Doing bicep curls every day will increase the exposure to stimuli that will promote muscular growth. While the biceps are a smaller muscle group, this allows for faster recovery times between each session to allow for greater total volume throughout a given week.

Improved Technique

While the bicep curls are a single joint movement, some skill is still required to effectively target the biceps. Greater exposure to bicep movements throughout the week will allow for more opportunities to improve one’s ability to perform the bicep curl.

Improved technique during the bicep curl can contribute to greater gains in size and strength in our biceps ability.

Greater Variation

There are many different ways to target the biceps, whether it be tempo reps, specialty bars (EZ curl bars, etc.), or the intensity of loading. 

While biceps tend to be a nagging muscle group for most, they should be targeted in a variety of ways to further promote growth. Furthermore, continue reading for different variations that you can implement into your daily bicep training to promote growth.              

The Cons Of Doing Bicep Curls Every Day

Less Volume Per Session

One of the fun parts about hitting arms is the feeling of the “pump” that we get during a high volume session. If our daily volume is spread out throughout the week it becomes a bit more difficult to get the pump.

If the pump is a main driver for you, then I would stick to bigger arm sessions less frequently throughout the week. 

Decreases Focus For Other Aspects Of Training

Within a training session there is typically a focus that is placed on a compound movement or a muscle group.  While hitting bicep curls every day can help with muscle development of the biceps, it can take up a slot that might decrease focus from other muscle groups.

Increases Time Spent At The Gym

Time is somewhat of a commodity, make sure that you are spending the bulk of your time towards your main goals. This could be the squat, bench, and deadlift if you are a powerlifter, or bigger muscle groups like the chest or back if you are a bodybuilder. 

Additionally, life events and work can supersede the time that is spent in the gym as well, so ensure that the priorities are being fulfilled across the board. Make sure you can afford to fit extra bicep curls into each of your workout sessions, therefore not detracting from your main goals.

Different Variations Of Bicep Curls

Here are variations that utilize a variety of gym equipment for you to improve your daily bicep training.  Later in the article, I’ll put these exercises into a daily bicep program for you.

Barbell Bicep Curls

This is my all time favorite variation for building the biceps. The barbell curls improve forearm strength, while allowing for additional loading of the biceps.


EZ Bar Bicep Curls

Similar to the barbell curls, the EZ bar can be loaded up heavily as well. This exercise can be used in varied grips to target the long and short head of the biceps. 

EZ Bar Bicep

Dumbbell Supinated Bicep Curls

If I’m not using the barbell, alternating supinated bicep curls are my go to. This exercise is challenging and allows for targeting of the total bicep muscle.


Dumbbell Hammer Curls

Hammer curls target the outermost part of the biceps while targeting the brachioradialis which is the thick part outside of our forearm. 

While some sort of conventional curl such as the barbell curl or ez bar curl should take up the main slot of a bicep curl program, some type of hammer curl or single-arm side curl is necessary to promote total bicep development.

Dumbbell Hammer Curls

Dumbbell Side Curl

Similar to the hammer curl, the dumbbell side curl is a great addition to an arm workout by allowing for greater range of motion towards the end range to target the muscles of the upper arm and forearm.


Cable Machine Rope Curls

Using the cable machine can help simplify the curling movement and allow for greater mind muscle connection over the amount of weight that you implement into training. 

This should be done secondary to any complete curl such as the cable straight bar curl or the barbell curl.

Rope Curl

Programming Bicep Curls Every Day

Here I have provided several everyday bicep curl training programs that utilize a variety of rep ranges, variations, and intensities: 

Novice-Intermediate: Example #1

  • Monday: Barbell Curls: 4 x 5 @75%
  • Tuesday: Dumbbell Hammer Curls: 3 x 10 @65%
  • Wednesday: Dumbbell Side Curls: 3 x 12 @60%
  • Thursday: EZ Bar Curls: 4 x 5 @75%
  • Friday: Straight Bar Cable Curls: 3 x 15 @60%
  • Saturday: Tempo 3 Second Lowering Barbell Curls: 3 x 5 @50%

Intermediate-Advanced: Example #2

  • Monday: Mid-Way 2 Second Pause EZ Bar Curls: 5 x 5 @65%
  • Tuesday: Seated Supinated Curls: 4 x 8 @60%
  • Wednesday: Cable Rope Side Curls: 3 x 15 @55%
  • Thursday: 21’s EZ Bar Curls: 2 x 7 halfway up/ x 7 halfway down from top/ x 7 full range of motion @50%
  • Friday: Seated Hammer Curls: 2 x 10E @60%
  • Saturday: Spider Curls: 2 x 12 @50%

Check Out Our Other Arm Training Guides

Final Thoughts

Training arms every day is a simple and effective way to overcome training plateaus to strengthen and increase the size of your arms. However, prior to implementing an every day bicep program, I recommend you evaluate your goals and physical abilities to ensure that it is absolutely necessary or worthwhile to incorporate this protocol.


About The Author

Javad Bakhshinejad

Javad Bakhshinejad was born and raised in the Washington Area. Currently, he is a student at Seattle University where he’s been pursuing an MS in Kinesiology, and has been a Strength Coach in the athletic department. He was a competitive bodybuilder for 8 years where he later transitioned to competitive powerlifting for 4 years. Currently, He has his own personal coaching business, where he works with powerlifters and bodybuilders.