How Much Should I Be Able To Squat (By Age, Weight, & Gender)

how much should i be able to squat

Are you becoming more experienced with powerlifting and wondering, “How much should I be able to squat?”

It’s hard to know a good squat weight if you don’t know what the average squat is for your age and weight. I’ve done the research and provided the data for the average male squat standards and average female squat standards. I’ve also compiled the average squat weights for 19 to 39-year-olds.

The following data represents all of the 19- to 39-year-old lifters who have competed in the International Powerlifting Federation (IPF). The data from these lifters were used to provide average squat strength at each age and across all IPF weight classes. 

This data is intended to be used as a reference point for powerlifters and to see how relative strength changes across these age groups and weight classes. However, the average person who lifts recreationally can still get an estimate of what their squat weight should be based on this data. 

Make sure to check out our other strength guides and standards:

How Much Should I Be Able To Squat?

Below, you’ll find two tables: a squat chart by weight for men and a squat chart by weight for women. You can use these squat strength standards to determine if your squat is on par with that of other lifters or if you need to increase the maximum weight you can squat.

Don’t get discouraged if your squat weight is lower than the numbers in the squat weight charts below. Remember that these squat strength standards are based on competitive powerlifters’ squat averages

Also, note that the numbers below are for the barbell back squat. Front squats are a different lift than back squats and are not performed during powerlifting meets, so front squat data is harder to come by. However, for reference, most lifters’ front squats are about 80-90% of their back squats.

Male Squat Standards (in Kilograms)

Column1Column2Column3Column4Column5Column6Column7Column8Column9Column10
AgeWeight Class
53kg59kg66kg74kg83kg93kg105kg120kg120+ kg
19124134153170182197211227242
20114139156174186202215229248
21121145160177191205218233257
22130147166180194208223239251
2396145167179196207223239254
24133147165181194208222236255
25130142162181195208224239256
26124143161180193207224240262
27N/A141165180193207224233261
28N/A145166175195206221238259
29N/A140162177193206222233265
30N/A150164178192206218236263
31N/A156163180190205219229258
32N/A154171178191205218233260
33N/A144169179193203217233256
34N/A152171177190205215229257
35N/A162167174190204216235249
36N/A153165182185202219232246
37N/A167168171183198212228254
38N/A145168178183200209229254
39N/A142162177182200209230245

Female Squat Standards (in Kilograms)

Column1Column2Column3Column4Column5Column6Column7Column8Column9Column10
AgeWeight Class
43kg47kg52kg57kg63kg69kg76kg84kg84+ kg
1973779197105110124120135
20768390100106116116125141
21758995105110121128127144
227493100106111111126129145
237391100107113125122128147
24N/A8998107113129132130140
25N/A8798107113123121127141
26N/A9198104113117125128144
27659097108113117129126146
28N/A9399104113121103126143
29N/A84100105112119145125139
30N/A9298103109129141124135
31N/A8896102109119131121139
326087101103110112127125135
336092101104110106109124133
34N/A899710211296115124131
35N/A889695103128117118128
36N/A9297104113146152119127
37N/A9296106110112124120126
38N/A911001081089198117128
39N/A92102103110119113117127

What Is the Average Squat for a 19-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 19-year-old is 2.1 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 19-year-old is 1.6 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 124kg to 242kg for men and 73kg to 135kg for women.

Male 19-Year-Olds

Across the weight classes, the 53kg 19-year-olds have the strongest back squats on average compared to the other bodyweight categories. The 120+kg lifters have the weakest squats of the 19-year-olds. We can assume this is because they have less lean muscle mass despite a heavier body weight.

Female 19-Year-Olds

Across the weight classes, the 52kg 19-year-olds have the strongest squats on average compared to the other bodyweight categories. The 84kg lifters have the weakest squats of the 19-year-olds at 1.4 times body weight on average.

What Is the Average Squat for a 20-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 20-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 20-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 114kg to 248kg for men and 76kg to 141kg for women.

Male 20-Year-Olds

The data shows that the relative squat strength of male 20-year-olds has a downward trend as weight classes increase. The weight class with the highest relative squat strength is the 66kg class, with average squats of 2.37xBW. The weight classes with the lowest relative strength are the 120kg and 120+kg class, with average squats of 1.91xBW.

Female 20-Year-Olds

The lighter weight classes have better relative strength on average than the heavier weight classes. The highest strength levels are the 43kg class, with squats of 1.77xBW. The lowest squat strength levels are the 84kg class, with 1.49xBW squats.

What Is the Average Squat for a 21-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 21-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 21-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats range from 121kg to 257kg for men and 75kg to 144kg for women.

Male 21-Year-Olds

As the weight classes increase, the average relative strength decreases. The class with the highest relative squat strength is the 59kg class, with 2.46xBW squats. The 120kg class has the lowest relative strength, with squats of 1.94xBW.

Female 21-Year-Olds

Across the weight classes, the 47kg 21-year-olds have the strongest squats on average compared to the other bodyweight categories. The 84kg lifters have the weakest squats of the 21-year-olds at 1.90 times body weight on average. 

What Is the Average Squat for a 22-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 22-year-old is 2.3 times body weight.  The average squat weight for a female 22-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 130kg to 251kg for men and 74kg to 145kg for women.

Male 22-Year-Olds

The average relative squat strength has a downward trend as the weight classes increase, with the strongest squat weight from the 66kg class at 2.51xBW and the lowest from the 120+kg class at 1.93xBW.

Female 22-Year-Olds

According to the data, the lighter lifters have stronger squats on average than the heavier weight classes when body weight is factored in. The strongest relative squats are from lifters in the 47kg class at 1.99xBW. The weight class with the lowest relative strength is the 84kg class, with squats at 1.53xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 23-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 23-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 23-year-old is 1.8 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 96kg to 254kg for men and 73kg to 147kg for women.

Male 23-Year-Olds

The weight class with the strongest relative squat for 23-year-olds is the 66kg class, with average squats of 2.54xBW. The weakest squats for 23-year-old males are from the 53kg class at 1.80xBW, which is likely because there is limited data for this weight class at this age.

Female 23-Year-Olds

The data shows that for female 23-year-olds, relative strength decreases as the weight classes increase. The 47kg class has the strongest relative squats at 1.93xBW, and the 84kg weight class has the weakest squats relative to their body weight at 1.52xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 24-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 24-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 24-year-old is 1.8 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 133kg to 255kg for men and 89kg to 140kg for women.

Male 24-Year-Olds

Across the weight classes, the 53kg 24-year-olds have the strongest squats on average compared to the other bodyweight categories. The 120+kg lifters have the weakest squats of the 24-year-olds at 1.96 times body weight on average.

Female 24-Year-Olds

The data shows that as the weight classes increase, relative strength decreases. The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength for 24-year-old females at 1.9xBW. The 84kg class has the lowest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.54xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 25-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 25-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 25-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 130kg to 256kg for men and 87kg to 141kg for women.

Male 25-Year-Olds

The lighter weight classes have better relative strength on average than the heavier weight classes. The highest strength levels are the 53kg and 66kg classes, with squats of 2.45xBW. The lowest squat weight is the 120+kg class, with 1.97xBW squats.

Female 25-Year-Olds

The data shows that as the weight classes increase, there is a downward trend in relative strength. The 52kg class has the highest relative squat strength for 25-year-old females at 1.88xBW. The 84kg class has the lowest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.51xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 26-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 26-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 26-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 124kg to 262kg for men and 91kg to 144kg for women.

Male 26-Year-Olds

For the 26-year-old males, the 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.00xBW. The 66kg and 74kg classes have the highest squat strength relative to their body weights at 2.43xBW.

Female 26-Year-Olds

For 26-year-old females, there is a downward trend in relative strength as weight classes increase. The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.9xBW, and the 84kg class has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.52xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 27-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 27-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 27-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 141kg to 261kg for men and 65kg to 146kg for women.

Male 27-Year Olds

The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.94xBW. The 66kg weight class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.49xBW.

Female 27-Year-Olds

For 27-year-old women, the weight class with the highest relative squat strength is the 47kg class at 1.91xBW, and the weight class with the lowest relative squat strength is the 84kg class at 1.50xBW. 

What Is the Average Squat for a 28-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 28-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 28-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 145kg to 259kg for men and 93kg to 143kg for women.

Male 28-Year-Olds

According to the data, the 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.99xBW. The 66kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.52xBW.

Female 28-Year-Olds

For 28-year-old females, the 47kg weight class had the highest relative squat strength at 1.98xBW, and the 76kg class had the lowest relative squat strength at 1.35xBW. However, it is important to mention that the 76kg class has less data because the class is new as of 2021.

What Is the Average Squat for a 29-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 29-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 29-year-old is 1.8 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 140kg to 265kg for men and 84kg to 139kg for women.

Male 29-Year-Olds

Among 29-year-old males, the 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.94xBW. The 66kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.46xBW.

Female 29-Year-Olds

The data shows that the 52kg class has the highest relative squat strength for 29-year-old females at 1.92xBW, and the 84kg has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.49xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 30-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 30-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 30-year-old is 1.8 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 150kg to 263kg for men and 92kg to 135kg for women.

Male 30-Year-Olds

The data shows that there is a downward trend in relative strength as the weight classes increase. The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.97xBW. The 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.54xBW.

Female 30-Year-Olds

For 30-year-old females, there is a very similar level of relative strength among the 47-76kg classes, but the 47kg has the highest relative squat strength at 1.96xBW. The lowest relative squat strength was the 84kg weight class, with squats at 1.48xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 31-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 31-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 31-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 156kg to 258kg for men and 88kg to 139kg for women.

Male 31-Year-Olds

For 31-year-old males, there continues to be a decrease in relative strength as the weight classes increase. The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.91xBW, while the 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.64xBW.

Female 31-Year-Olds

For 31-year-old females, relative strength decreases as the weight classes increase. The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.87xBW, and the 84kg weight class has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.44xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 32-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a 32-year-old male is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 32-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 154kg to 260kg for men and 60kg to 135kg for women.

Male 32-Year-Olds

There is a downward relative strength trend as weight classes increase for 32-year-old males. The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.94xBW. The 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.60xBW.

Female 32-Year-Olds

For 32-year-old females, the 52kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.94xBW. The 84kg has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.49xBW, with the 84kg+ only slightly behind at 1.50xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 33-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 33-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 33-year-old is 1.6 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 144kg to 256kg for men and 60kg to 133kg for women.

Male 33-Year-Olds

For 33-year-old males, there is a decrease in relative strength as weight classes increase. The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.94xBW. The 66kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.56xBW.

Female 33-Year-Olds

For 33-year-old females, the lighter weight classes appear to have higher levels of relative squat strength than the heavier weight classes (except for the 43kg class, which has limited data available). The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.96xBW, and the 76-84kg+ classes have the lowest relative strength at 1.4xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 34-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 34-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 34-year-old is 1.6 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 152kg to 257kg for men and 89kg to 131kg for women.

Male 34-Year-Olds

There is a downward trend in relative strength as weight classes increase for 34-year-old males. The 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.91xBW. The 59kg and 66kg classes have the highest squat strength relative to their body weights at 2.58xBW and 2.59xBW, respectively.

Female 34-Year-Olds

For 34-year-old females, relative squat strength decreases as the weight classes increase (apart from the 69kg class, which has limited data because it was only introduced in 2021). The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.9xBW, and the 69kg has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.39xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 35-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 35-year-old is 2.3 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 35-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 162kg to 249kg for men and 88kg to 128kg for women.

Male 35-Year-Olds

The data shows that the 120+kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.92xBW, and the 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.75xBW.

Female 35-Year-Olds

For female 35-year-olds, the data shows that the 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.87xBW, with the 69kg class not far behind at 1.86xBW (although the data set for 69kg is limited due to it being so new). It also suggests that the 84kg class has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.40xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 36-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 36-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 36-year-old is 1.8 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 153kg to 246kg for men and 92kg to 127kg for women.

Male 36-Year-Olds

For 36-year-old males, the data suggests that the 120+kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.89xBW, and the 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.60xBW.

Female 36-Year-Olds

The data suggests that the weight class with the lowest relative squat strength is the 84+kg at 1.41xBW. The weight classes with the highest relative squat strength are the 69kg and 76kg classes at 2.0xBW (but this is subject to change once more data is collected in these new weight classes).

What Is the Average Squat for a 37-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 37-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 37-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 167kg to 254kg for men and 92kg to 126kg for women.

Male 37-Year-Olds

For 37-year-old males, the 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.90xBW. The 59kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.83xBW.

Female 37-Year-Olds

For 37-year-old females, there is a downward trend in relative strength as body weight increases. The 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.96xBW, and the 84+kg has the weakest relative squat strength at 1.40xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 38-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 38-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 38-year-old is 1.6 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 145kg to 254kg for men and 91kg to 128kg for women.

Male 38-Year-Olds

According to the data, the 120kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.90xBW. The 66kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.55xBW.

Female 38-Year-Olds

According to the data for the 38-year-old females, the 47kg class has the highest relative squat strength at 1.94xBW. The 84kg has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.40xBW.

What Is the Average Squat for a 39-Year-Old?

The average squat weight for a male 39-year-old is 2.2 times body weight. The average squat weight for a female 39-year-old is 1.7 times body weight.

Depending on the weight class, squats will range from 142kg to 245kg for men and 92kg to 127kg for women.

Male 39-Year-Olds

For 39-year-old males, relative strength decreases as body weight increases. The 120+kg class has the weakest squat strength relative to their body weight at 1.88xBW. The 66kg class has the highest squat strength relative to their body weight at 2.45xBW, with the 59kg slightly behind at 2.40xBW.

Female 39-Year-Olds

According to the data, the 47kg and 52kg classes have the highest relative squat strength at 1.95xBW. The 84kg weight class has the lowest relative squat strength at 1.39xBW.

Read More: 

How Does Squat Strength Vary Among 19- to 39-Year-Olds?

how does squat strength vary among 19 to 39 year olds

The data on squat standards suggests that there is no significant difference between strength levels of 19 to 39-year-olds. The relative squat strength stayed consistently between 2.1xBW and 2.3xBW across all weight classes. Female relative squat strength stayed consistently between 1.6xBW to 1.8xBW.

Although we may assume from this data that we do not get stronger as we age, we have to keep in mind that we do not know how long these lifters have been lifting. Perhaps many lifters started lifting in their 30s and do not have much training experience under their belt.

We know that the longer we are involved in powerlifting, the more potential we have to build additional lean mass – which will result in strength gain because we have more contractile tissue working to move the weight.

For this reason, we can conclude that increases in squat weight are possible as we age as long as increases in lean body mass occur. We also need to continue refining our technique through trial and error.

It should be mentioned that the lower weight classes for each age group tended to have stronger relative strength than the higher weight classes.

This is most likely because the lighter classes’ body weights reflected more lean muscle mass. The heavier classes were more likely to have more fat mass (which is not contractile tissue). Therefore, they wouldn’t be able to lift more weight despite being heavier.

Is It Hard To Squat Your Body Weight?

Squatting your body weight can be difficult, especially if you are new to the barbell back squat and/or have a higher body weight.

Factors like limb proportions, body weight, previous athletic experience, how long you’ve been lifting, and the program you follow can all determine how much you should be able to squat and how difficult it is to squat your body weight.

For example, a beginner squat weight for someone who’s only been lifting for three months may only be 65% of their body weight. 

However, the more you squat, the quicker you increase your average weight. After training consistently for 6-12 months, you should be able to squat your body weight. If you keep following a solid squat program, you’ll likely eventually get to a point where you can easily squat your body weight for multiple reps.

How To Find Your Maximum Weight for Squats

Plug Your Current Rep Max Into an Online Calculator

If you have a current rep max for your barbell back squat (for example, an 8 rep max), you can use an online strength calculator to determine an estimated one rep max.

Calculate It Using a Formula

You can also calculate your estimated one rep max squat weight using the below formula:

  • 1RM = W x (1+(r/30))

W is the weight you can squat. R is the number of repetitions you can complete at that weight.

If you can squat 150 lbs for 8 reps, the formula would look like this:

  • 1RM = 150 x (1+(8/30))

Complete the formula in this order to determine a weight you should be able to squat for one rep:

  • Divide 8 into 30 to get 0.27 (rounded up)
  • Add 1 to 0.27 to get 1.27
  • Multiply 150 by 1.27 to get ~190.5 (your estimated one rep max)

Test a New Max Squat Weight in the Gym or at a Competition

The most accurate way to determine your one rep max squat weight is to attempt it in the gym or a competition. Instead of relying on a formula to tell you what you should be able to squat, you’ll know you can actually do it if you test it.

When testing a new squat max in the gym, ensure you have a spotter or use a rack with safety straps or pins. (You’ll have spotters if you’re attempting a new PR in a competition.) Starting with a weight that’s about 30-50% of your goal one rep max, perform a few warm-up sets of 1-5 reps until you’re at about 95% of the goal weight.

Once you’ve finished your warm-up sets, load the bar with your goal weight and attempt one rep while maintaining proper form. If you can successfully squat that weight, it becomes your new one-rep max.

Tips for Improving Your Squat Form

Below are several tips that can help you increase your squat weight. While they likely won’t result in immediate gains, you should notice that your barbell back squat feels easier after a few weeks or months of implementing these tips.

1. Wear Heeled Squat Shoes

Shoes with an elevated heel make it easier to squat deeper. They also help you feel more stable, and that security can help you overcome mental blocks when squatting heavy weights.

2. Work On Your Hip and Ankle Mobility at Least 3-4 Times Per Week

Tight hips and ankles are common reasons for not being able to squat with proper form. Working on your mobility outside the gym can help make it easier for you to squat to depth without losing your balance.

3. Do Pause Squats

By pausing for 2 seconds at the bottom of a squat, you remove the temptation to “bounce” out of the hole. Pause squats encourage you to remain tight at the bottom and teach you how to generate power to stand the weight back up.

4. Make Sure Your Stance Is Optimal for Your Limb Proportions

If you’re tall and/or have long femurs, you may need to do back squats with a wider stance to shorten the distance you have to squat. If you have short legs, you can get away with a narrower stance.

5. Record Your Lifts

Recording your back squats will enable you to see how they look, so you can identify faults in your technique and work on improving those specific issues.

6. Squat More Often

Doing back squats more often throughout the week gives you more opportunities to perfect your form. If you’re only squatting once a week, try increasing it to 2-3 times per week so you can get more reps in and dedicate more time to improving your technique.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a 2x Bodyweight Squat Good?

A 2x bodyweight squat is decent for men and very good for women. If you’re a male with a 2x bodyweight squat, you can likely be competitive with some professional powerlifters who weigh the same as you. If you’re a female, a 2x bodyweight squat would make you stronger than many other lifters of the same weight.

Is a 3x Bodyweight Squat Possible?

A 3x bodyweight squat is possible, but not everyone will be able to achieve it. Getting to that point will require a lot of consistency and dedication to training and diet. But even if you do everything correctly, you may not achieve more than a 2.5x bodyweight squat.

How Much Should You Be Able to Squat for Your Weight?

Most people should aim to squat at least 2x their body weight. So if you weigh 150lbs, you should be able to squat 300lbs. However, it can take several months or years to work up this level.

Final Thoughts

If you’re asking yourself, “How much should I be able to squat?” the answer depends on several factors like gender, body type, training frequency, programming, and diet.

For example, the average squat weight for a female will almost always be lower than the average squat weight for a male. As well, an elite male powerlifter who competes in the 120kg weight class will almost always be able to squat more than an average male gym-goer who weighs 80kg (176lbs).

It is also important to emphasize that longevity in the sport will likely lead to gains in relative strength by developing proper technique and muscle mass that will make you more successful in the future.


About The Author

Amanda Parker

Amanda Parker has a passion for competing and coaching in both powerlifting and weightlifting. She uses her knowledge from her Kinesiology Degree, CSCS, and Precision Nutrition certification to coach athletes and lifestyle clients for performance in training and nutrition. Connect with her on Instagram.